EMI 350 style combination speakers, Single Point Source Monitors

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EMI 350 is what the manufacturer called a "combination speaker", in the USA a mere coaxial, the elliptical cone 'combines' the sound of bigger and smaller round drivers giving a smoother so more detailed reproduction of recorded material and a tweeter mounted across the bass driver gives a Single Point Source meaning music travels as a single waveform, phase accuracy higher than Tannoy Dual Concentric or Altec Duplex due to their long throat concentric tweeter horns.  Duplex however were the only speaker said to be used by The Beatles at Abbey Road Studios, it was a special tube harmonics, high sensitivity, large diameter speaker designed for tube amplifier speaker Output Irons.  The 350 was a Long Throw bass (like the REALISTIC Minimus-7) these have higher distortion than the previous 319 preferred by classic tube amplifier collectors.  However the 350 was designed for Solid State power supplies, giving a tighter bass over the 319 that is mainly for tube rectifier amplifiers.
Because the 319 used cone tweeters, it's real outdated as a modern sound source partly due to single tweeter dispersion and partly to voice coil distortion in cone tweeters from their real small voice coil formers.  Better dispersion in cone tweeters and whizzers can be effected using bulb dispersion lenses like the George Sioles one above left.  The bulb added in front of the cone tweeter must be rigid, it's fashioned out of resin.  The Peerless cone tweeter above is horn loaded, modern tube speakers put a dome tweeter in the center.  Right EMI STD 400 series preamplifier is clearly based on the QUAD 22 and the STD logo at the top right hand corner seems not what was meant to be there, the origin or purpose of the QUAD II beside its use for High Fidelity, is mysterious, they were in fact made for other uses for instance in early computer systems or nuclear attack early warning systems.  The metal strips above the STD/400 preamplifier suggest mounting in radiograms but the build quality is remarkable to say the least.
Left the 10 watt per channel Orthotone STD/381 EL 84 power amplifier was Hi-Fi stereo, 0.1% Distortion., 30Hz-20KHz, +/- 0.1dB.  Right Hi-Fi EL 84 audio amplifier, the EMI STD 381.  Note the steel shielding under the irons prevent stray interference to other radio equipment, possibly located underneath, the amplifier boasting -80dB noise, 4dB better than the EL34 STD/383 with 20Hz-20Khz and 25 watts per channel, a 10dB improvement over the 1952 QUAD II.  A photo for the Specto Avionics Head Up display - apparently for schools and colleges equipped with television cameras, shows Air Marshal Sir Douglas Morris KCB CBE DSO DFC of the Royal Air Force with Major Clarke and Alec Smith who developed the EMI DLS 1 speaker and sold it to Herbert Weisberg, President of Scope Electronics USA, although these products were being got rid of as such,  suggesting they had been made with some other purpose in mind, probably for use by the military and in secret places like nuclear attack bunkers.  Perhaps EMI planned at one time to equip schools in preparing for an event where large population centers of Britain would be destroyed after a nuclear attack.  However the British were imperialists and it's likely the large number of EMI units were produced for the British Empire that at this time was in decline after Suez.  Civil war in Zaire would soon claim AlNiCo magnets.  Specto made a whole load of weird air force stuff, some even back-engineered by the USA, EMI a completely mysterious company then and still secret.
hi-End audio experts prefer modern speakers for vintage hi-End tube amplifiers.  However the 319 remains truly exceptional in recreating whatever was recorded at the stereo microphone and in its 1970s version is a great achievement few modern speakers could match, only severely limited in the 'sweet spot' as extremely small.
Left the EMI 450 for the STD 400 series above has famed twin hard PVC plastic tweeters, the rarest 350 speakers (for the STD 300 series) also have twin 2.5 inch tweeters only made of paper like the American Bozak B-200Y tweeter pair.  The twin tweeter EMI 350 in 15 or 20 watt power are never seen on eBay at all!  (Right the KLH Research X).  Have they all been destroyed?  Or do they continue to be useful?  Twin tweeter 350 speakers are better, there's a problem of sound being too directional with single tweeters.  Ribbon tweeters and electrostatic speakers also suffer from 'car headlamp-like beam sound' and so are seen with diffusers and horns to widen the sweet spot at the listening chair, allowing the listener to relax and move his head freely.  Twin tweeters widen the sweet spot making the rare twin tweeter 350 speakers exceptionally valuable on eBay.
Back e.m.f. is an unwanted small amount of power fed back from speakers, the way a microphone sends power to an amplifier.  1970s 3-way speakers likely send three sets of back e.m.f., one from each ferrite magnet driver, less if AlNiCo drivers.  The amplifier and speakers are meant for amplifiers of similar vintage designed to cope.  (Right a Marconi 13 x 8").  1990s speakers are "Bi-wired" to help reduce back e.m.f. problems developing since AlNiCo magnet production ceased after the Civil War in Zaire.  1960s speakers were to be connected to tube amplifiers with Output Irons, the x-over in EMI combination speakers were designed for Leak Output Iron behavior.  Output Irons are much affected by back e.m.f. compared to modern amplifiers, one reason is the AlNiCo magnet was inherently resistant to back emf.  The ferrite magnet tube speakers were carefully designed to cope with vintage back emf behavior but this isn't so with ferrite magnets after the year 1980 that weren't made with tube amplifier output irons in mind.  Many 1970s Sansui speakers have AlNiCo magnet drivers and sound best with tube amplifiers although their brand match catalog range are Solid State.  Owners of the 'Audiokamaloka' web thread variety, puzzle over the mediocre result of own brand Sansui vintage amplifier and speaker matches not knowing about design for back emf.  These Sansui speakers were listened to at the factory with Japanese 'Circlotron' tube amplifiers instead of the Solid State products they'd be heard with at home.  'Audiokamaloka' web threads think they know it all, dismissing such claims as 'utter rubbish' and 'bad advice to give people', but it was a fault of marketing pointed out by the British industry, careful to partner only certain speakers and amplifiers in the best bang for the buck 'separates' market.  B&O, SONY and REALISTIC all paid close attention to partnering amplifier and speaker sound quality.  The Japanese at Sansui quite rightly used tube amplifiers for auditioning, believing Solid State to be inferior, their amplifiers manage to sound better on other brand speakers and people assume that all do, it isn't so, all own brand vintage often matters.
Left above Sansui speakers voiced on Mr Shimada's CSPP patent amplifiers of 1952.  Cross Shunt Push Pull Topology is recognized as the thinking behind the evolution of modern amplifiers and the demise of the Output Transformer in tube amplifiers.  This 'cutting edge' Japanese technology was never real popular with the British Imperialists.  Left the Decca Decola had only an FM radio, no A.M. or L.W.  We need to be real careful in partnering equipment of Japanese origin, that the speakers chosen are meant for a particular vintage of amplifier - or poor sound results.  Folks then say they had Japanese stuff and it sounded so so.  The British audio industry have long rejected outside influences in pursuit of their own perfection.  Mocked Oriental speakers are actually quite remarkable if correctly matched.  Web threads like 'Audiokamaloka' forget that it's not the piece of audio equipment that necessarily sounds bad, so much as the decision making on the part of the audio buyer, matching up the wrong vintage and type of equipment, often on what is available at a bargain price.  That's no way to go about getting anything but a bargain - forgetting sound quality.

The 'Circlotron' sound Sansui speaker engineers wanted to hear.


Decca Decola radiogram below with EL34, KT77 output tubes, puts the power supply low down in the cabinet to avoid hum, the power amplifiers and Output Irons are in separate modules to keep speakers wires short, for example to allow solid silver strand speaker wire, the stereo preamplifier is on one side of the cabinet.
Listen before buying?  The eBay bidder and stereo buyer doesn't need to hear before buying if an expert audition panel is agreed a set works best together.  The problem with most magazine reviews and 'Audiokamaloka' web threads is the sets they heard are all different.  Some magazine reviews offer the test audition set but for only one source, say Compact Disc with a speaker and amplifier.  For that reason the audio press in the early 1980s were telling buyers to set their system up for a main source - listened to most of the time, that made life easier for magazine reviewers.  However the B&O, REALISTIC and to a lesser extent due to their real poor reliability, SONY systems, take great care with speaker and amplifier matching.  But the amplifier and its speaker are a pair.  Certain gear pairs designed to work together give off a tone known to give long life and another tone known to be unreliable.  Only engineers are able to partner these gear sets.  Similarly, partnering audio equipment needs either 'own brand' chosen sets or recommended partnering of separates as in matching an EL34 tube Output Iron to its best loudspeaker.  Dynaco ST-70 is real popular US EL34 output tube amplifier.














KT 77, EL34 above is surely one of the most memorable tubes, partly from the kind of folks who owned these hi-end tube amplifiers, their quiet confidence in the equipment.  Back then we thought that in 20 years the sound quality would be ubiquitous but it wasn't to be, instead folks strive to preserve the greatness of those times.  The battleship sums it up.
"Tung Sol" above was a brand claiming unusually high linearity in tubes of the mid-1950s, based in the state of New Jersey in the USA, a place with a battleship named after it.
<<Left an advert showing EMI, like its cohort DECCA, were heavily involved in hi-tech military projects.  EMI also made the electronics for the ill fated TSR.2 jet.  The development of OTL, CSPP and the Electrovoice 'Circlotron' likely affected their withdrawal from audio.  But for Output Iron vintage tube sound, EMI are still useful.
Early Solid State amplifier Output Irons work with real expensive obsolete germanium transistors that are unreliable in suffering serious overheating called 'thermal runaway' - sounding better and more wonderful the closer they approach failure temperatures.   These amplifiers also suffered from a loud hiss caused by high distortion devices and were Lo-Fi relative to tubes in the STD 300 series.  Constantly blowing fuses using only their own, very high sensitivity AlNiCo magnets they're easy to drive, low power speakers.  The silicon transistor was sold on its claimed "freedom from thermal runaway" but (in fact) lacked the awesome germanium transistor sound and was above all cheaper to make and sell.  Right Germanium transistors  were far more expensive than even hi-End tubes.  Amplifiers like the QUAD 50E and 303 tried to simulate tube sound, the early 303 sounding best of all but in later years silicon transistor amplifiers came to make their own 'best sound' with specially matched speakers that vintage EMI speakers obviously don't achieve.  Newer Solid State sounds best with only the original prototype test, matching speakers of the factory, catalog or long term owners.

 

10 Watt 319 (tube rectifier) pleated edge left and 350 (Solid State rectifier) roll edge, long throw above

The 92390FT 319 has the single solid cap of the 450 with which it also shares the ten watt L coil, but the 350 has two such solid caps behind the tag board.  Note black PVC ring on the tweeters above, cover a foam, preventing any 'memory ringing' in the paper tweeter pleated edge, see the tweeter rivets in the 350 and slot head screws on the 319.  Each has a ten watt x-over L coil similar to the plastic tweeter EMI 450.  The larger 15 watt 350 magnet for roll edge Long Throw, as the cone travels further, is continued in the 92390FT left above.  Bass in the 350 and 750 Long Throw series was thought 'overblown' in 1968, a much stronger bass sound than the more natural EMI 319.  10 watt rating is quite high compared to the 6 watt Wharfedale Super 8 RS.DD but forget modern Home Theater receiver power, these speakers should only be connected to same vintage equipment.  It's about the price of quality today in Home Theater electronics compared with tubes of yesteryear, they're different systems.

No voice coil wires on the 10w tweeter cone as absent in the 15w 92390KE versions


 

Leak Stereo 30 is a pure germanium transistor amplifier, if getting solder renewed stay away from the transistors!  Replacing the resistors and capacitors supporting them is suggested.  Rated at 0.1% THD for 8 watts output, with full output -66dB noise figure, it's a fair amplifier to try the 'germanium' sound with 10 watt EMI 350.  But later with the Leak Stereo 30 Plus, engineers tried increasing the output power and silicon transistors are likely to replace the Germanium, not many owners care to give such details.

Leak Mini Sandwich speakers left have an elliptical driver, described in their circa 1966 adverts as thoroughbreds - to appeal to the echelon of British society who went to watch horse racing.  A story suggests elliptical speakers radiate sound more at their narrower side and avoid sideways interference in stereo speakers.  Hi-End audio designers claim a mono single speaker source sounds more natural but with EMI's Alan Blumlein, the founder of stereo sound, the EMI elliptical drive unit gets past the concerns of two speaker source interference.  Many Leak speakers were built quirky - appearing real time consuming to make and unusual.



 

B&O Beomaster 900, 2 x 5 watts at 4 ohm only, for 10 watt, 4 ohm EMI 350 etc.  Don't use 4 ohm speakers with amplifiers giving more distortion at the 4 ohm load, use amplifiers like B&O designed to run 'undistorted' at 4 ohm impedance!  Some people are not too strong on these points so some amplifiers need a 15 ohm loudspeaker to run 'undistorted' and have 4-15 ohms printed on the rear plate, this kind of amplifier has higher power at the lower impedance but the distortion penalty paid is disregarded!  Distortion of such amplifiers can be 3 x higher at the low impedance, this will spoil audio results, the greater low impedance power is not needed if using instead a more sensitive speaker.  Most modern speakers are not sensitive enough for 1960s Solid State or tube amplifiers.  Peter J Walker of QUAD likened the volume control to the focus wheel on a camera and this should give the novice an idea of what these 'window on the performance' amplifiers are all about.  Not about being loud or powerful, the aim is to capture a true stereo effect that comes up like a phantom when the distortion and power is low enough.  Volume should never be turned up without fear of too much distortion and blurring of the images, a stern discipline taught the previous generation by using germanium transistor amplifiers.  The silicon transistor has become a different pursuit of poorer quality power that many people today don't know to be a truly 'second class' Solid State sound quality.

Armstrong 521, Another germanium transistor amplifier, with the recommendation to replace stock output AL102 devices with Mullard OC 28 to avoid failure of devices under bass extension.  The germanium transistor had a sound encouraging power limit, loud playing with bass, a lesser but reliable Silicon output amplifier is the Onkyo A-33, suited to the Shure M75EJII cartridge - possible UK eBay site find.  Below Russian Germanium AL102 equivalents have real good sound quality, blowing of circuit fuses is due to modern music bass extension, being a remarkable effect folks just can't resist playing with.

 

£76 UK, $122.82, pair of 92390KE coaxial, there's a single baffle tweeter version of this 350 bass unit

 

 


15 watt chassis L coil 1970s EMI 350  Note the difference between the ten watt bronze basket L coil and 15 watt below.EMI 15 watt L coil
 

The EMI 92390CM chassis above was a bass/mid 13 x 8 speaker built into cabinets as shown below and powered by tube amplifiers.  The x-over is the same but the tweeter is up on the baffle in 2-way box style, although not as good as the combination speaker as not a 'point source' they were an EMI design that caught the popular market.

Right the late production run, 15 watt 350, has a chassis mount 'L only' coil x.o., its most interesting feature in the tweeter above being the smallest possible tweeter dust cap, apparently of a natural material, the aluminum bass center cone was treated with a special natural base lacquer as natural materials are reputed to sound better.  Full 3 tags on the wiring board, the tweeter has a shorter length voice coil former and may not even be a paper one!  The type of on-board chassis coil is seen on the Goodmans Trebax bass unit, a cast chassis, also in green hammer tone.  (The Trebax is another revered vintage driver).  A capacitor is mounted behind the wiring board possibly a red 'metaxial' type around which was wound the older 350 15 watt L.C. x.over.  Many people couldn't care less what a capacitor looks like but others delight in original product details. These late production run EMI 15 watt tweeters are interesting as lacking any voice coil wires on the cone and lacking the PVC covering over the tweeter foam covered pleated edge as seen in the late 1960s 10 watt EMI 350.  The silver bars with slot head screws are unusual as is the green -ve pole tweeter wire.  The green wire seems to take place of the red wire at the top tag with the black wire (above) replaced by a red wire!  See how slack the tweeter wires are and the way they don't fit through the chassis in the older more time consuming fashion suggesting falling standards of manufacture and cost cutting.

Sellers of QUAD 303 - can we have a lid off picture to see which have the old 1960s irons?  Also buyers want to see if the units are original since so many are modified, what are the MODs?

1968 EMI 350 15 watt chassis, LC x over & 1960s QUAD 303

1968 EMI 350, 15 watt, 25 / 30 Hz - 20KHz, 11,000 Gauss high flux magnet.

Left below the EMI 350 red 'metaxial' capacitor in the orange sleeve, as seen in the EMI 650 for Solid State rectifier, germanium transistor amplifiers.
Leak tube amplifier rebuild services claim to improve Vintage Classics but do they?  Trouble with flashy audio mods is lost original sound quality and lost Euphonic Distortion of original parts!  New Rhodium plated phono sockets sound real good on the shelf but put them in and you might wish you'd left them out!  Re-wiring with 99.99% pure silver wire, insulated with PTFE and silver soldered on all joints, sounds just like a $200 lunch!  But don't buy it - as silver wire increases current and will affect sound quality, you'll hear more treble, but Classic components work together to reproduce a total effect!  Add an Alps pot (volume knob) and quality switches and distortion is cut right down but do 'Idiot Techs' also modify the original Negative Feedback loop?  - No, they don't mention any clever stuff at all, Idiot techs perform probably stupid swap-out mods on Leak amplifiers originally engineered by genius teams these techs could never match!  Tube amplifier rebuild services can be just like a bunch of idiot artists promising to 'improve' any original Leonardo masterpiece, folks are fool enough to offer.


 

If someone like Bob Carver did a Leak amplifier rebuild he would first measure the sonic signature of a perfect classic, add in the cheapest lightest weight components then restore the exact original sonic signature, not a so-called improved one!  An 'improved' sonic signature is not acceptable, 'Idiot' Techs should try building their own brand new tube amplifiers if confident they've improved what they've rebuilt!  Same goes for even QUAD, trying to improve their DIN socket 405 power amplifier!  The 405-2 was not a great product but real popular with customers only able to hear how loud it could go with the wrong speaker matches, the real popular double mono QUAD 410 was just like a lower end, Class B Push Pull EL 34 Ultra Linear audio amplifier from the Far East, while the original QUAD 405 DIN socket power amplifier was completely magical, musical and fascinating.  The above 410 conversion of an original 405 using a QUAD kit, resulted in the set being relegated to the loft where it rusted, suggesting the front heat-sinks are made of steel not aluminum.  After 405 conversion to 410 the owner wished he'd left it alone and couldn't bear to look at the outcome of his greed for more power.

7591A tubes in the Fisher 500c are better for EMI 319 British speaker voice than the Jazzy 7591

 

If techs could measure the sonic signature of a Leak 12.1 and recreate it, why don't they?  Perhaps Bob Carver owns the only patent capable of it.  So maybe 'idiot techs' need to form an association to get their standards of restoration up to original Vintage Classic sonic specifications?  All too often we're seeing 'idiot ideas' like improving current being improving Power from I x V, but more power is not important with originally matched 'sonic signature' speakers!  Leak Stereo 50 below has less power (2 x 25w) than a Leak Stereo 60 <<(2 x 30w) left , a more powerful design but with compromised sound quality at any volume setting.  Their main hope is driving ESL-57 speakers (but in vain).  Getting an 'Idiot Tech' to increase the power output from a Leak Stereo 50, is just not real clever!  More power is more distortion.  Instead you need the best speakers to work with the Leak Stereo 50, these 'best speakers' are the ones Leak himself would have had hooked up at the factory in the 1960s, not the 'best speakers' for modern amplifiers!


 

Leak TL/25 Plus, 32 watts per channel, 450 volts on EL 34, Class B / Push Pull.

Leak Stereo 50, right, 1958 year, (a mouse had been living on this one at one time) 25 watts per channel, 380 volts on EL 34, Class B / Push Pull stereo symmetry layout metal chassis with Shorter-Wigan preferred tag board solid core hook-up wire circuits but C-R-C power supply filtering, single 5AR4 (GZ34) rectifier tube supplies both channels.  3925 Output Transformers with 50% screen taps for preferred triode sound.  Problems, failing cathode resistors seen above chassis.
Leak Stereo 60, below 1962 year, 35 watts max, 25 watts @ 0.1% distortion, 420 volts on EL 34 Class B / Push Pull with C-L-C power supply filtering.  8615 Output Transformers with 25% screen taps for more power.

 

Original EMI 319 'black and tan' cone, £330 each Japan, 'Lowther-like Jazz sound'

Tubes for EMI 319: 6L6, KT66, 7591A, these have a natural sound compared to the Jazzy 7591, hence USA EMI 319 are seen amplified by the New York origin Fisher Radio Corp. 500c and 800c with the 7591A output stage, these have a Solid State power supply not the old, higher quality choke tube amplifier supply, this Solid State supply is thought to give them their deep tight bass.  EMI speakers were popular in the New England and New York areas due to the location of Scope EMI Electronics and Benjamin EMI Sound Corp.  The 7591 has a different tube sound and EMI 350 is aimed at the different sounding KT 77 tube amplifier, today KT 77 is usually replaced with EL 34 / 6CA7, its bass extension suited to EMI 350.  The EMI 319, 8 ohm, mid 1960s 'black and tan' cones look sprayed to disguise the aluminum center cone, they're found in the Scope EMI 319 and Benjamin Model 92, they may not be sprayed but cardboard layering.  Early black and tan cone have a bare cork gasket and in the above photo, the later blackened cork gasket.  One 92390BP 319 speaker version has a blue tint black cone and tweeter partnered with the Fisher 500c or McIntosh MC225.  EMI sound slightly more entertaining than many older speakers, as if, given a choice of speakers, EMI is the one you'd end up choosing.  EMI 319/350 are N.F.M. like the Yamaha NS1000 but do suit larger rooms, they have a lot of sound volume for not much power, but the amplifier is critical, just don't assume yours will ever be okay with other than your usual speakers.

Here the Heathkit AA-100 has the Jazzy 7591 U.S. speaker voice tone

 

Leak TL12.1, 0.1% distortion, KT66 tube mono block, Class B / Push Pull.

Leak TL12 Plus, EL 84 tube, Class B / Push Pull.

QUAD II, KT66, 15 watts mono (GZ32 rectifier) 0.02% distortion, Class B / Push Pull.

 

EMI 630 chassis with Rogers EL84 Junior and Heathkit AA111 EL 84 amplifiers

'The cone' is the cone-shape bit of a speaker and it can be felt to vibrate when playing, the EMI 630 aluminum cone is real light, absolutely rigid yet freely suspended, following the audio signal with great accuracy, providing better transient response, better attack and recovery characteristics.  The elliptical shape of the cone with its varying measurements from voice cell to perimeter gives a wider band of sonic resonance and therefore better, smoother bass response.  The end result is a speaker with fine, clean, precise free flowing natural sound.

Still 10.5 x 6.5 ins., the EMI 650 is a later version of the 630, black capacitor on the 630 above differs from red metaxial/ orange sleeve on the 650.  Larger EMI 319 style orange sleeve x-over is seen on the early 630.  Single 630 make slow sellers in the USA. 
<<Left, Leak Stereo 20, (2 x 10w), EL 84 tubes.  Note large output irons.
EMI 650 are 8 watts RMS in power, the 630 only 5 watts continuous or 10 watts American i.e. 'Peak'!  Check wiring in a speaker and if it's solid conductor, fit similar.  Sellers who chop through solid conductor audio cables could be throwing away what today costs £2000 today for two six foot lengths.  Be real careful to preserve the wire lengths including any connectors, increasing the vintage value as modern wire may not compete on sound quality, old wire may well be thin and crumbling away but often the unique speaker wire is making a sound impossible to upgrade.  This audio tip is called Euphonic Distortion.

Rogers Junior through speakers best suited to precious tube watts


Scope EMI 630 enclosure has a 1960s EMI 630 chassis, a studio monitor, Japanese enthusiasts claim has no deep bass and its Leak TL12 Plus, the EL84 push pull tube amplifier as tested by the manufacturer, have soft muted bass but EMI speaker Frequency Response (F.R.) is boosted for such tubes and a cheap, possibly Solid State amplifier mismatch will make the poor bass the Japanese enthusiast has complained of.  As Leak TL12 Plus, sell over $2000US, some enthusiasts use cheaper wrong match amplifiers.  EICO HF81 has EL84 tubes but 2 x EZ81 rectifiers, so it's Lo-Fi and a C-R-C amplifier for the EMI 93670HS which is so rare today that an EMI 450 is a more likely Lo-Fi match.  EMI 450 and 93670HS are special Lo-Fi speakers made to get the best out of amplifiers like the HF81, real popular in the USA but a Lo-Fi tube amplifier.
"Befuddlement ...  How could this unassuming little integrated tube amp from 1959 make my painstakingly assembled cast of modern separates sound like they were emitting a sonic connect-o-dot drawing of the musical event?"

(Because you didn't match your modern separates properly, except on looks and what salesmen told you).

"OK, perhaps I am exaggerating a bit, but I would be lying if I didn't admit this amplifier could embarrass many well known sub-$2000 solid state amps (as well as more than a few tube compatriots)."

Audition opinion needs similar quality vintage equipment.  The Scope EMI 630 might be compared with the B&W D.M.1 not the Lo-Fi version of the EMI 630, their appearance is eye-popping weird but get no bids as real specially made for Lo-Fi amplifiers, yes the $1000US EICO HF80 is Lo-Fi and its Lo-Fi speaker has a white hard PVC tweeter, fixed like a diamond in the center on two strips of steel, its grey corrugated bass unit edge, is like two inches wide and just fascinating to look at, the cone and its wide suspension are one piece but Lo-Fi is a whole different branch of tube audio, so don't get things mixed up.  That hard PVC tweeter goes only to 13KHz.  EICO "Classic Series 2036" above left have a screened off control zone to keep stray hum away from the knobs and has the same Lo-Fi output transformers as the HF80, a single GZ34 takes the place of 2 x EZ81 in the HF80, both are EMI 93670HS speaker suited, Lo-Fi C-R-C power supplies, on first appearance real similar to the 1958 year Hashimoto-made Australian Encel X1212, left, also with Lo-Fi hum bucker and GZ34 tube rectifier.  Encel's later 1960s 'motional feedback' C.S.M. 40 M.F.B. amplifier, above, has itself a C-L-C Hi-Fi power supply with no hum and with Solid State rectifier suits the Hi-Fi EMI 650.  The Lo-Fi Encel and EICO may look real similar to inexperienced eBay bidders but the Hi-Fi Encel above right has a C-L-C choke bottom left.  Amplifiers are valued on power supply quality, the platform on which amplified quality stands or stumbles.
Left the EMI STD/381 EL84 amplifier with GZ34 removed, it had no choke but with better noise than most previous choke power supply amplifiers was a real curious design that received good reviews in the press and was made by Clarke & Smith at their Walington factory.  But like B&W, BTH and others in the BREMA Audio Group, were likely developed by EMI as prototype models for adoption by manufacturers.  Lowther speakers were in the BREMA group and their complicated speaker cabinets help explain the genius of EMI radiogram cabinets at this time as with the many speaker cabinet designs Clarke & Smith created for claimed School use, where in fact the schools would had have been make shift BBC studios in the event of a nuclear war.  These school studios might appear as the tube era equivalent of school and college internet cam streaming studios but as a means of the BBC reporting after a nuclear attack.  The EMI 13 x 8, 319 and 10 x 6, 630 combination speakers were compact near field studio monitors taking up a minimum of space, apparently for these ends and not as propaganda would have us believe that schools and colleges could afford main line EMI television cameras costing a nation's ransom.

Rogers Junior playing through speakers only for modern Solid State

 

The B&W B14/7W chassis has a double diaphragm or twin cone to eliminate cross over network distortion and e.m.f. found in 2-way speakers with a crossover, the whizzer acts as the single point tweeter with low phase error.  B14/7W were not used by B&W as single drivers, but as bass / mid drivers in their 2-way baffle speaker system.  Some transistor amplifiers of this vintage suited 2-way speakers, the rare Hi-End EMI 13 x 8 twin cone seems an experimental driver being used up by B&W as mid-woofers.  The whizzer is a real complicated device and this 13 x 8 is likely to have been developed early in the 1960s for the QUAD II,  B&W 2-way speakers are getting rid of these obsolete B14/7W speakers as an EMI surplus deal, the EMI B14/7W whizzer lacks Lowther and Richard Allan whizzer cone 'dispursment' plugs and fashion plays an important role in High Fidelity sales, Single Point source is only now finding favor again in U.S. studio monitors.  If customers are looking for tweeters in speakers, old whizzers, no matter how good with expensive tube watts, will not sell on audition to lower priced amplifier customers with cheaper Solid State watts.  In the B&W D.M. 3 the B14/7W was offered in so-called pairs with the old fashioned 13 x 8, B14/8W, a mid woofer that has no whizzer.  Any audio expert realizes that a mid woofer in one speaker and a whizzer cone in its stereo opposite don't make a stereo pair.  This odd pair problem is also one of cross over network in B&W D.M.3 as not carefully meshing the tweeter and bass unit in the manner a B&W customer has been led to expect, but 'one crossover size fits all'.

QUAD II tubes with Hi-End EMI whizzer cone speaker
The original M.O. (Marconi Osram) KT 66 issued with the QUAD II are rarely seen as claimed the best KT66 tube ever made and with short, 1 year lives at full power they last longer in low powered 1950s QUAD II, albeit by the year 1980, often troublesome and replaced, best with GEC Gold Lion, then around $200 each.  Where the KT66 are not Gold Lion it suggests the owner was not an enthusiast and repairs have been done by someone not most interested in the sound.  Many QUAD II sets worked in practical roles, some so specialist they need rebuilt as audio amplifiers, most fetch remarkable prices on eBay especially in the USA.  The Long Plate Mullard EF 86 has a totally different sound from the Short Plate Mullard EF 86 but the particular sound of the older Long Plate may well suit the EMI 319 13 x 8 speaker better.  The Short Plate Mullard EF86 sounds far more detailed on some more modern 3-way speakers; and with single driver speakers like the B&W B14 / 7W, the Short Plate EF 86 may well be found more suitable.  Telefunken Diamond gray and silver plate EF 86 are used with the EL 34 tube and to fit a Telefunken EF 86 in a QUAD II or where Mullard are usually seen is not recommended as the tubes can have different specifications.  However the EF 86 in QUAD II need to be a matched pair, the different Mullard EF 86 pair seen here suggest they are not a matched pair.  Collectors should not play about with the tube sets in QUAD II by buying from eBay, such tube amplifiers have to be carefully matched by a radio tech expert, occasionally with elements below the chassis having been changed.  The tube line-up positions of any tubes removed, should be carefully marked and the same tubes refitted after careful packing for transit.  This may be done with a diagram showing where each tube of a set belongs, drawing out the amplifier on a piece of paper as a rectangle with squares for the transformer irons and small circles for the tube sockets.

EMI 319 and early 630 chassis have large orange sleeved L.C. x.o.

Main 319 difference with 350 is wide corrugated PVC edge or 1960s bronze hammer tone basket with green label, however 1970s 319 with a green basket were still made for the QUAD II.  The 350 cone sits further back near the spider, an orange color voice coil suspension, than in the 319 as the 350 is a Long Throw and in general Long Throw speakers suffer many more distortions.  As a Long Throw however, the 350 bass in organ notes is probably not going to make the 319 sound better but remember the 319 was made specially for 'loose bass' tube rectifier amplifiers like the QUAD II.  A paper spot on EMI 319 or dimple in the ceramic magnet of 92390BP appears to indicate the wiring side of the speaker.  EMI 350 lacks these reassuring labels and the green EMI plastic labels dry up and come off, EMI 319 magnet did have a green label.  Only older EMI 350 have the wiring hidden in carefully placed black plastic sheaths like the 319.

 
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